VP Biden – still think the Obama Stimulus is “saving” jobs?

As the top Democrat leaders often like to look at current events via the past, a fair action would be to do the same. You don’t have to look very far back either. Just a few months ago, on Meet The Press, Vice President Biden stated

“The bottom line is that jobs are being created that would not have been there before.”

Today the final unemployment numbers for 2009 have been released. Expectations were that the number would be a mere 8,000 more jobs lost. Because December is of course a time when numerous seasonal jobs are created to handle the increase in shopping for the holidays. The reality was a loss of 85,000 jobs – 77,000 more than expected.

That brings the total jobs lost in 2009 to 4,200,000 or an average of 9.3%. Officially the current unemployment rate is 10%, up 2% from the levels promised by President Obama when he predicted imminent doom and depression if the $787 billion Obama Stimulus was not passed without hesitation. Though the Stimulus was passed the real unemployment rate – which is the number of people receiving a check from the Government AND those that are still unemployed and not getting a Government check (which the Government does not count) – stands at 17.3% currently. That’s a hair shy of the 16 year high of 1994.

Yet President Obama and Vice President Biden have hailed the Obama Stimulus as a boon to the public. They quote that 1.6 million jobs have been “saved” or created. They point to Recovery.org as proof that over 600,000 jobs were saved (where the other 1 million jobs come from is highly debatable).

Of course they leave out the fact that Recovery.org has figures that include locations across the nation that don’t exist, businesses that don’t exist, and in some cases more jobs being “saved” due to pay raises than employees in a business. Government math is beyond most college calculus abilities, which may be why when DOZENS of news organizations (except MSNBC) checked into the figures estimates of inaccuracies were as high as 18% of the numbers quoted by Recovery.org being wrong.

If, for some reason, we looked forward in time (which most Democrat leaders will not do, at least publicly) we hear a consensus of economists that state that 2010 will be a year of unemployment staying above 9%. These are often the same economists that agreed with President Obama about the Stimulus keeping unemployment at or below 8%. So take that prediction as you will.

But 2010 is also the year that some 30 – 40% of the Obama Stimulus funds will be spent (because immediate in this case can be defined as 12 – 18 months later, especially if elections are involved). Added to that is proposed another $175 billion in the H.R. 2847 – Jobs For Main Street Act (Passed the House in December 2009) which is summarized as follows:

Project Vote Smart staff and volunteers are working hard to produce a clear and accurate summary of the contents of the bill. At this time, we have posted the voting record for HR 2847 so you can see how the office holder representing you has voted on this piece of legislation. We will have a detailed summary available as soon as possible.

Meaning that it quite likely is yet another Bill that was passed by the House of Representatives that is unread because it is unfinished and/or unwritten.

The net result of some $475 billion being spent is estimated to reduce the unemployment rate 1% over the course of the entire year. But there is another quote that seems appropriate. It was a promise of President Obama.

“This election is about the past vs. the future. It’s about whether we settle for the same divisions and distractions and drama that passes for politics today or whether we reach for a politics of common sense and innovation, a politics of shared sacrifice and shared prosperity.”

Common sense, like the math used at Recovery.org. Innovation, like the way Bills are being passed by Congress without being read or even being printed. Shared sacrifice, which is definitely covering the nation with 17.3% unemployment and record foreclosure rates. But shared prosperity? I suppose 3 out of 4 is not too bad.

Rating 4.00 out of 5

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